The Japanese Film Festival is one of the oldest country-based film festivals in Singapore, which is apt given that Japan is one of the countries with whom Singapore has had the longest relationships. Furthermore, this year marks the 55th anniversary of Singapore-Japan relations – SJ55. What better way to celebrate this friendship than with an excellent line-up of contemporary and classic Japanese films?

JFF aims to showcase the best of Japanese contemporary and classic cinema. The festival’s hope is that film will bring about more awareness of and raise interest in Japanese culture in its many diverse manifestations. Building on the close relationship, this year’s festival celebrates a re-introduction to the many expressions of Japanese cinema genres.

2020 was a trying year for festivals. In fact, no industry was spared. It was the first time that JFF, and many other film festivals, had to adapt to the COVID-19 lockdown reality. Many thought that this year would see a return to normalcy. Alas, it is not to be. However, this time, armed with the past year’s experience, JFF 2021 is more prepared and even more ambitious, working with more partners and showcasing more programmes that will hopefully be enjoyed by both long-time followers and new audiences. 

Come what may, JFF is here to stay.

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About JAPAN CREATIVE CENTRE

Japan Creative Centre (JCC) was established in 2009 through agreement between Japan and Singapore as a base to showcase Japanese culture and also to disseminate information on Japan to Singaporeans. With the underlying theme of “Innovation and Tradition” it creates a space for many to experience the charms of Japan and holds a wide variety of events to help nurture a better understanding of Japan. Going on its 12th year, JCC will continue to explore new and exciting programmes to better engage with the people of Singapore.

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About THE JAPAN FOUNDATION

The Japan Foundation was established in 1972 as a special legal entity to undertake international cultural exchange and was subsequently recognised as an independent administrative institution in October 2003. The Foundation consists of a head office in Tokyo, a branch office in Kyoto, two Japanese-language institutes (Urawa and Kansai), and 25 overseas offices in 24 countries (including two Asia Center liaison offices). It aims to cultivate friendship and ties between Japan and the world, and create global opportunities to foster friendship, trust, and mutual understanding through culture, language, and dialogue.

Japanese Film Festival (JFF) is a project by The Japan Foundation to create a platform to raise ASEAN audiences’ interest in Japanese films and to draw in a larger crowd. The JFF provides opportunities for people to gather offline and online, under the vision of building an extensive bridge between the Asia-Pacific film market and the Japanese film industry. To increase people’s interest in Japanese films and to create new market opportunities for Japanese films, three schemes are planned: strengthening the network by carrying out Japanese film festivals in ASEAN countries and Australia, organising PR events that fans can participate in, and constructing an online platform.

Since 2017, Japanese Film Festival in Singapore has been carried out as a part of the JFF project, initiated by The Japan Foundation.

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About SINGAPORE FILM SOCIETY

Singapore Film Society (SFS) is the largest organiser of film festivals in Singapore. They have collaborated with a wide range of partners – from theatrical distributors to diplomatic missions to academic and cultural institutions – to present the best of international cinema in Singapore. SFS is renowned and popular for its leading-edge programming and organisational skills in film festival management and marketing.

Some of our key events include the annual European Union Film Festival, Japanese Film Festival, and the Singapore Chinese Film Festival. The mission statement of the Singapore Film Society has been to promote film appreciation as art and entertainment, as we hope to bridge the gap between art house cinema and the commercial film industry.

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